Is your employer OK with you keeping an up to date profile on Monster.com?

Since leaving college, I have always been pretty good at keeping my resume up to date.  This actually surprises me because I am typically prone to procrastinate on these administrative types of tasks.  But early on in my career I got in the habit of updating my resume every time I felt I reached some sort of milestone (stuff like getting a promotion, learning new technologies, annual review, etc …).

I keep 2 copies of my resume.  A ‘master’ copy that I just keep adding things to (currently 8 pages), and a shorter version (2 pages) that I am continually adding and removing things from.  The short version is what I end up putting on Monster.com, Linkedin.com, and submit when applying for a job.

So why am I writing about any of this?  Well, keeping my Monster and Linkedin profiles up to date was a serious point of conflict with a supervisor I had at a previous employer.  It turns out a relative of the companies founder worked as a head-hunter at tech placement agency here in Jacksonville FL.  So every time I would update my profile this head-hunter would let my boss know that my resume was ‘active’.  Then my boss would come down on me and ask why I had my resume on Monster.

I don’t see any problems with keeping my professional profile up to date.  Even though I may not be actively looking for a new job, keeping my resume up to date keeps me plugged into the job market here in Jacksonville (it lets me know what my skills are worth – giving me some leverage when negotiating compensation).  And with the current state of the economy, and the current unemployment trend I would think you would have to be crazy not to have you resume ready in case you have to make a move.  But my boss and I never saw eye to eye on this issue and it ended up being one of the reason that I moved on to other opportunities*.  

So … let me ask you -

My opinion on these questions is probably pretty clear, but I am curios what everyone else thinks …

  • Is your employer OK with you keeping an up to date profile on Monster.com? 
  • Are you a supervisor?  If so, would you ask an employee to remove their resume from Monster.com? 
  • Does anyone see any ethical problems with an employer requesting that you remove your resume from Monster.com?

 

* There is true irony here.  My boss (the guy who had the problem with me keeping my profiles up to date), accidentally emailed his resume to EVERYONE in the company.  I am not sure exactly how he managed to do this, but it was pretty damn funny.

That’s it. Enjoy!


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An employer should probably have no cause to worry if you are in the habit of updating your profile regularly. It is a sign that employees value the recognition they get from showing off the work they do.

But if an employee suddenly updates a profile after several months of inactivity, that would be something to explore. But don't treat the symptom (by asking them to remove the posting), but instead ask the employee if something is amiss and can be fixed.

If you did this outside of company time, the boss had no business about how you managed company time

Posted by: PK on February 15, 2009 04:25 PM

Ha-ha. Your boss emailed everyone his resume??? That's pretty funny. Can't believe, after this he's asking to remove yours from Monster.

Posted by: Corey on February 15, 2009 04:40 PM

I supervise several teams and encourage everyone to keep their resumes up to date. We recently started making that encouragement more official and when it's time to do performance evaluations we remind everyone that they should do so before the evaluation. I can't see why anyone would discourage having an office full of confident, marketable employees.

Nice. Sounds like you did the right thing.

Posted by: Matt on February 15, 2009 10:41 PM

I work at EDS and they expect me to keep my resume updated, at least every 6 months. We use resumes for any internal job postings. We often provide resumes for our clients when bidding on work. They don't care about Monster.

I've only recently started thinking this way. I usually run away from job sites and anything requiring boring administrative tasks as the ones you were talking about. But, in the end, why not?

I don't think my bosses would be angry at me for keeping my resume online, but I am pretty certain they would start worrying and considering the option of not having me as an employee. So it goes both ways.

Certainly, not thinking about other job opportunities doesn't guarantee in any way your employers won't think of ways of getting rid of you. So it's actually a twisted sort of job hygiene.

I also have an understanding with my employer that I would let them know when I am searching for another job. It is a little awkward, but then again, it is a matter of trust.

Posted by: Guilherme on February 16, 2009 07:24 AM

Hi Matt, funny thing with your supervisor ahn?
I work at IBM and here they motivate me to keep my resume up to date, in order to use it with job postings here, on a monthly basis.
I had interesting experiences here, and i also have my resume up to date in some regional websites (i'm from brazil). My manager also motivates me to keep my resume up to date in those websites, not only in IBM.
Their mentality here is to provide the tools to develop a carreer, even if it means leaving here.

An employer shouldn't worry about it, however an employer will surely worry loosing his valuable employee.. I think thats the cause.. So you must be proud of yourself.

Posted by: BKahuna on February 16, 2009 11:27 AM

I don't think there is any problem with your keeping your resume up to date on Monster. But I can see that the reality is that it may make some bosses a bit nervous. Is it necessary to keep it posted on Monster?

If you wish to avoid controversy I would think you could keep your resume up to date on your PC and not post it or post it on Monster but keep it private (which is what I do). I prefer to avoid having unknown recruiters calling me to offer me great opportunities in COBOL programming anyway.

BK

Posted by: barry ward on February 16, 2009 07:05 PM

as a founder of a small dev company, here are the factors that come into play for me for viewing loyality
1.) as an employee, i was loyal to no one only my projects, technology and the fun in the office
2.) output per individual vary widely. factors of 5-10 viewed in the short term, possibly 100 in the medium term if you get a star. yet pay differs 10-30%. you can not upset the applecart. this is exasperated by the fact that monetary contribution is generally not defined and so people like sales can often earn higher and people in some professional services demand higher, even though this is pure costs. managers are very reluctant to earn less than their team.
3.) you invest in people while they get up to speed and you try to recoup that later.
4.) maybe it is because we are small but we do wish the best for everybodys career and the livelihood of their dependents and if we can not provide that best of luck to them elsewhere. but i would be pissed with them and annoyed with myself if someone left us for a 10% pay rise, which may be the difference to them (trainees especially here as we carry them for a year)
5.) looking back at the corporations i worked at. managers may or usually are not as generious, i will say they do want u to make them look good, they probably have mis represented their skills to their managers and have become dependant on a few individual's knowledge base, which they can not loose but do not have the freedom to give incentives to stay. but everybody is different.
6.) when i see the guys post their resumes, it does keep me on my toes and more perks are dished out but this is defendant on future bullishness, which is usually governed by budget in the corps and resume posting will definately be viewed as misloyality by all not technical staff especially hr
7.) well nobody has left us yet. i sincerely hope this continues
8.) back in my days as a contractor, i always viewed the market as cyclical and tried to maximise my return in the good times (my biggest drop in revenue was 90% in 2001) anyway. it is time in the cycle to go as permanent as u can get by dropping prices and fitting into a company that has been unable to fill a role that it viewed as essential. back in the last recession it was a bloodbath in web development. it can not be as bad this time but a resume and getting it out there is your best defence. now whether u need it permanently displayed, i believe that is of no use as you get bugged by recruiters who are speculating to say the least. looking for a job was a 12-14 hour a day job that i hated as it really was work. recruitment companies got very deceiving as jobs dried up.

Hi Matt,
Its a really funny story. I can't believe, why employer are so scared about employees CV. I believe if company gives better facility to their employees, they will not leave them frequently. By the way, here is the situation in my case-
I holding Team Leader position in a USA based outsourcing company. I never think that my boss have any head-ache about this issue rather they like to talk much with us about work. However, I think good employer should encourage their employees to keep up to date their CV. So that all employee will encourage to learn good things to make their CV rich. It is ultimately a good things for a company.

At least once a year I will evaluate the job market. I will actually monitor sites like monster, careerbuilder, and craigslist and keep a log of all posted jobs in my area over a 3 month period. This provides me with a good idea of what my skills are worth and the state of the job market. I keep my monster and linkedin profiles updated as well as the resume on my personal site. I also use sites like salary.com which I don't really use when determining my worth but are just fun to play with.

Posted by: your friend on February 19, 2009 07:03 AM

good one.. we will talk about it...

LOL so funny :D
I do just the same and update my CV very oftenly. In fact am looking for a job and I guess my boss knows about it :D, he even talked to me about it twice :D!

Posted by: Dave Ferreira on February 27, 2009 02:05 PM

I have been in your situation before, where an employer sees an updated resume in ANY type of circulation as something of a disloyalty to either him personally or the company. Truth be told, though, the days of the type of employment my father's generation had is long gone - where people work for a company most if not all of their adult lives, and the company for the most part took care of them up to and through retirement.

The request to take your resume down is treating the symptom of a perceived problem and not a true effort to determine if in fact there actually is a problem. If you are an under-performer in a job, well then posting an update to your resume may solve my problem at the least, and maybe yours too - happy trails to you. But the effort would be better served for the good to above average players to see if there is a problem and what the manager (or company) can do to make it right - if anything.

A very similar thing happened to me in my last perm position before I became a consultant. I kept my resume updated online, and as a result when the market was hot I got calls and emails from recruiters (on my email accounts and cell phone, not the company, I should add). My boss knew my resume was out there - that is how he lured me away from the company I worked for prior to his. Still, one day he asked me why and I told him that although overall I liked working there, at times I felt like I was underpaid. Should the balance of times spent wishing I was not there ever tip the wrong direction, it is nice to know I have options. All things that had been covered in the previous 2 reviews, I should add. His response: if you hate it so much, leave - and then he stormed off and like some sort of petulant child, pretty much refused to speak to me for a week.

That was it for me. I answered an email from a recruiter about a consulting gig, and less than a week later I gave notice. The boss/owner? "Why are you leaving?" "Because you told me I should and then spent a week making me FEEL it, too." "Yeah, but I didn't think you actually WOULD go...I was just mad your resume was there."

Posted by: anonymous on March 2, 2009 08:51 PM

for a boss to ask you to remove/unlist your resume from monster makes me think: "the beatings will continue until morale improves"

What about your boss silently passing on your next promotion/raise because your resume is active? i would consider it a factor to not put someone in a lead position on a project, if i knew they were looking to jump ship.

I currently work in a small start up and I'm not in charge of anyone, but I totally agree with the first and second comments (Krishna Kumar and Adwait Ullal). As long as I'm doing my job and updating my Monster and LinkedIn profile outside of company time, he has no right to talk to me.

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  • Amgad wrote: I currently work in a small start up and I'm not in charge of anyone, but I totally agree with the f...
  • anonymous wrote: for a boss to ask you to remove/unlist your resume from monster makes me think: "the beatings will c...
  • Dave Ferreira wrote: I have been in your situation before, where an employer sees an updated resume in ANY type of circul...
  • Ahmed IG wrote: LOL so funny :D I do just the same and update my CV very oftenly. In fact am looking for a job and I...
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  • Rush wrote: At least once a year I will evaluate the job market. I will actually monitor sites like monster, car...
  • Ehsanul Haque wrote: Hi Matt, Its a really funny story. I can't believe, why employer are so scared about employees CV. I...
  • barry ward wrote: as a founder of a small dev company, here are the factors that come into play for me for viewing loy...